The 1984 car was even more dramatically arrow-shaped and it also boasted an important modification in the distribution of the air flows: the air first went through the radiator and then the heat exchangers before being expelled through the sides. The driver was seated even further forward, so much so that new rules were introduced restricting the position. The front suspension wishbones had wider bases and the engine power was boosted by a further 10%. Carbon disk brakes were also introduced which cut the weight of both the car and, of course, any unsuspended mass.

For the first time in many, many years, Ferrari had a new Italian driver in the form of Michele Alboreto, who won at Zolder. However, the 126 C4 was simply not able to compete on an equal footing with the McLarens, and Belgium was their only win of the year. At the end of the season, Ferrari came second in the Constructors’ Championship, a good way behind the winner. Alboreto and Arnoux came fourth and sixth respectively in the Drivers’ which Lauda snatched from Prost by a mere half point.

Type rear, longitudinal 120° V6
Bore/stroke 81 x 48.4 mm
Unitary displacement 249.40 cc
Total displacement 1496.43 cc
Compression ratio 6.7 : 1
Maximum power 485 kW (660 hp) at 11,000 rpm
Power per litre 441 hp/l
Maximum torque -
Valve actuation twin overhead camshafts per bank, four valves per cylinder
Fuel feed twin turbos, Lucas-Ferrari or Weber-Marelli electronic, indirect injection
Ignition electronic, single spark plug per cylinder
Lubrication dry sump
Clutch multi-plate
Frame monocoque, Kevlar and carbon-fibre composite structure
Front suspension independent pull-rod, twin wishbones, inboard springs over telescopic shock absorbers, anti-roll bar
Rear suspension independent pull-rod, twin wishbones, inboard springs over telescopic shock absorbers, anti-roll bar
Brakes discs
Transmission 5-speed + reverse
Steering rack-and-pinion
Fuel tank capacity 220 litres
Front tyres 25.0-9.0-13
Rear tyres 26.0-15.0-13