The 248 F1 is the fifty second single-seater built by Ferrari specifically for use in the Formula 1 World Championship. The project, which goes by the internal code of 657, represents the Scuderia’s interpretation of the technical regulations which apply in 2006; the main new feature of which is the introduction of an eight cylinder V configuration engine, with an overall capacity of 2400 cubic centimetres. In fact, the name of the car derives from these key figures relating to the power unit. The chassis of the 248 F1 is lighter than that of its predecessor and its shape has been revised, with modifications to the openings of the side pods and in the area of the deflectors. The cooling system has been substantially revised and not simply to meet the needs of the new engine. The location and size of the rear-view mirrors is one of the most obvious novelties. Other significant changes include the engine air intake, the engine cover, the size of the fuel cell, the aerodynamic elements on the side pods and the layout of the exhausts. The gearbox – seven speeds plus reverse – represents an evolution of the carbon one introduced on the F2005 and it continues to be mounted longitudinally. The front suspension continues the classic design for Maranello single-seaters. However, the rear suspension has been designed to meet a key objective, which is to increase the overall aerodynamic efficiency of the rear end and to mechanically improve the usage of the Bridgestone tyres. This work was also supported by the Fiat Research Centre.

As key elements to achieve these objectives the aerodynamic design of diffuser and the floor of the car have been extensively redesigned and in collaboration with Sachs, particular attention was paid to the dampers. As was the case in 2005, extensive design work went into the electronic installations, with the support of Magneti Marelli. Continued co-operation with Brembo has enabled another step forward with the braking system. The 056 engine is load-bearing and is fitted longitudinally. Design work began back in the spring of 2005 and naturally, took into account the strict limits laid out in the FIA technical regulations, in terms of the angle of the V, weight, dimensions and centre of gravity. The first example of the V8 engine ran on track in the month of August and development was initially carried out with it fitted to an F2004. As in 2005, engines have to be used for two consecutive grands prix.

With this in mind, Shell’s support has been even more invaluable in defining the specification for fuels and lubricants best suited to meeting set targets in terms of reliability and performance. Driveability was another important factor, when defining the new engine’s characteristics, with the regulations requiring fixed inlet trumpets: engine management is controlled by an integrated injection and ignition system from Magneti Marelli. The 248 F1 renews a tradition for Ferrari Formula 1 cars fitted with V8 engines, last seen in 1964 with the 158 F1. As usual, great attention is paid to the behaviour and optimisation of the materials used, from the design phase and through quality control, always striving to maximise the level of performance and to achieve the highest possible levels of safety.

Type rear, longitudinal 90° V8
Bore/stroke -
Unitary displacement -
Total displacement 2398 cc
Compression ratio -
Maximum power -
Power per litre -
Maximum torque -
Valve actuation twin overhead camshafts per bank, four valves per cylinder
Fuel feed Magneti Marelli electronic indirect injection
Ignition electronic, single spark plug per cylinder
Lubrication dry sump
Clutch multi-plate
Frame honeycomb and carbon-fibre composite monocoque
Front suspension independent push-rod, twin wishbones, torsion bar springs, telescopic shock absorbers
Rear suspension independent push-rod, twin wishbones, torsion bar springs, rotary dampers
Brakes carbon-carbon composite discs
Transmission electro-hydraulic 7-speed + reverse
Steering mechanical power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Fuel tank -
Front tyres 13”, Bridgestone
Rear tyres 13”, Bridgestone