To improve the 1992 single-seater, an active suspension system was tried out which boasted electronic control of the underside of the car on the track and more conventional aerodynamics were adopted. The 65° V12 engine remained but the new version debuted at the German GP. It had pneumatic springs for the valves that upped the revs and thus the power, but also meant that just two larger valves could be used instead of the three required by normal springs.

But even this car could not prevent Ferrari from having a very difficult year. The Scuderia came just fourth in the Constructors’ Championship with 28 points. Gerhard Berger had returned to the team after a three-year absence, but it was Alesi who got the best result of the season with a second at Monza. Even the F93 A lagged behind its rivals in terms of technologies, especially Alain Prost’s Williams which won him a fourth World title. At the halfway point in the season, Jean Todt took over as Director of the GES Racing Division.

Type rear, longitudinal 65° V12
Bore/stroke 88 x 47.95 mm
Unitary displacement 291.63 cc
Total displacement 3499.65 cc
Compression ratio 13.3 : 1
Maximum power 548 kW (745 hp) at 15,000 rpm
Power per litre 213 hp/l
Maximum torque -
Valve actuation twin overhead camshafts per bank, five valves per cylinder
Fuel feed Weber-Marelli electronic indirect injection
Ignition electronic, single spark plug per cylinder
Lubrication dry sump
Clutch multi-plate
Frame honeycomb and carbon-fibre composite monocoque
Front suspension independent push-rod, twin wishbones, electronic actuators to control ride height and roll
Rear suspension independent push-rod, twin wishbones, electronic actuators to control ride height and roll
Brakes carbon-carbon composite discs
Transmission electro-hydraulic 6-speed + reverse
Steering rack-and-pinion
Fuel tank -
Front tyres 13”, Goodyear
Rear tyres 13”, Goodyear